Tag Archives: internet

Why you need your own space on the Web

The other day I encountered a tweet by a well-known Norwegian C++ programmer, Patricia Aas on Net Neutrality and we exchanged a few mentions regarding that very topic. She was trying to make a case for the use of web browsers over apps, citing serial abuse by app owners.

These days, social media platforms seem to have come to a head. The era of innocent social media fun and banter seems to be over. The violation of this innocence probably began with the Arab Spring, when Twitter rose to prominence as a powerful tool for political activism. During the rise of ISIL, and then ISIS, merchants of death began to make audacious appearances on the same site. Then came the US 2016 elections and the fallout from the Cambridge Analytica affair, which resulted in much hue and cry about election interference.

Social media is toast. All the same, we still flock to the watering holes, most of us oblivious of the crocodiles that lay in wait (or perhaps many are just too thirsty to even care).

Nowadays social media giants wield a lot of power, power that they derive from other people’s data. I am not saying that they are doing any thing wrong. I am convinced that the onus lies on the users not to do themselves a disservice when they totally trust and depend on these companies. It seems we are in a time where people simply refuse to accept responsibility for they own lives.

And this is why many have lost out. How many, like me, lost all their data after MySpace was sold? What about all the time invested in Google Plus? How many remember how Facebook vowed not to mash up WhatsApp data with that of the parent company, only to break that promise a few years later? Some people get banned or suspended for their harmless political views, simply because some “fact checker” at a company disagrees with them — does something have to be consensual before being accepted as a fact and how bland is social interaction without dissent?

Am I advocating the avoidance of social media sites? Absolutely not. That they have done us all a good service is not in doubt. After all, this post is written on WordPress.com, a social blogging site. What I am saying is that we, the consumers, need to start playing smart with our use of these services. There are 2 simple things I have started to do that could help:

  1. Have a strategy for regularly backing up ALL your data from social media sites.
  2. Develop your own space. Start off by buying a domain. Host your own website — and it doesn’t have to be anything fancy — and work to mirror your social media content

What do you think?

Photo by Nikita Kachanovsky on Unsplash

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Problem with stand-alone executables?

Well, I just have to share this with whosoever is desperately looking for a solution to this problem and happens to stumble across this post.

It’s not easy being a newbie in any thing, and computing is no exception.

I have written a small program that I will be using for my work in the office and which would also benefit a few staffers. I wrote it in C++ and compiled it using Visual Studio. However, I couldn’t find the executable file (*.exe) anywhere on my computer!

I went over to the MSDN site, as well as StackOverflow, looking for a solution but there was none in sight. To make matters worse, I discovered that MANY beginner programmers were facing the same issue.

Then I found this video on YouTube – and voilá! – problem solved. The answer to my question is ridiculously straightforward; indeed, ignorance is very costly.

If you’re in a bind like I was, I hope this works for you the way it did for me!

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My experience doing R trainings at work

Recently, the office decided to set up a small team to manage its social media presence. Because I had somewhat encouraged the development, I was asked to work with them, at least as a facilitator.

Somewhere down the line, I suggested to some on the team that they should consider carrying out analysis of the social media data, at least beyond the metrics that were already available on most of those sites.

I quickly put together a very rudimentary, but useful, Shiny app, (not without some inspiration from this guy) just to demonstrate a bit of what was possible, and they were eager for me to train them in the use of R. I will share more about the app sometime later.

Application that plots social media data

Screenshot of the Shiny app developed for the team

My aim was (and still is) to get them to a point where they could carry out basic analyses on their own and grow from there. I tried to keep the material as basic and non-intimidating as possible – some of the students admitted to a morbid fear of statistics and I didn’t want to scare them off with anything too tough.

I consider myself a beginner still, so this experience really broadened my own understanding of the language. And I had a lot of fun doing it.

Well, I put together some slides on the training sessions and felt I should share them and hopefully get some feedback. Here they are:

  1. Introduction to R Programming
  2. R Data Structures – starting them off on vectors
  3. R Data Structures (Pt. II) – diving into the basics of data frames
  4. R Data Structures (Pt. III) – examining ways of working with matrices
  5. R Data Structures (Pt. IV) – lists (and lists)

The good thing is that some friends and colleagues (outside the office) have told me that, in the coming year, they would like me to train them as well in the use of R.

It’s only an opportunity for me to, yet, learn the more.

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Advantages and Disadvantages of Using IDE [sic]

This is a good blog. I use IDEs, but my take on them is this: It makes a lot of sense for learners to start with manual before moving on to automatic, because the day you’re forced to drive manual, you may find yourself unable to do so.

Expert Wannabe

IDEs are simply programs to write programs. They are generally editing environments with tools
to help programmers write code quickly and efficiently. As an example, we can create PHP-driven
web applications using a combination of Eclipse and PHPEclipse. Core features typically include:

Code completion or code insight: The ability of an IDE to know a language’s
keywords and function names is crucial. The IDE may use this knowledge to do such
things as highlight typographic errors, suggest a list of available functions based on the
appropriate situation, or offer a function’s definition from the official documentation.

Resource management: When creating applications, languages often rely on
certain resources, like library or header files, to be at specific locations. IDEs
should be able to manage these resources. An IDE should be aware of any required
resources so that errors can be spotted at the development stage and not…

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Let’s talk (please!)

People talking

I tried something out recently. There was a time I was part of one of these high yield investment programs (HYIP), which many will tell you is actually a fancy word for SCAM.

Anyway, somebody I trusted (and he is indeed trustworthy, to a fault) invited me to participate in a particular program and after a while I got bored with it. Of course, I wouldn’t be fooled to actually drop any dollars into the site, particularly as due diligence revealed that, at that particular time, people were not able to withdraw their funds when they needed them. Of course, I never recruited anybody, but tried to find whether this program could be any use to me as an individual. This was some 5-6 years ago.

Why am I talking about this? Well, recently, as I was looking at the stats on The Opportunist. I discovered that a few years ago, this blog was enjoying a lot of views with the referrals coming from this HYIP site. Wow, I thought to myself, I had better get back on this program now!

I rejoined the program a couple of years ago, and after ignoring them for a couple of weeks, they gave me $10 worth of credit for what they call the “Traffic Exchange” which got me 200 views on any site of my choice. The Opportunist in me couldn’t resist the opportunity, (haha!) and truly, I began to enjoy a significant increase in traffic.

A few days ago, I received a visitor to a recent blog posts that I had shared via an Empire.Kred “mission” (see this blog for an explanation). Interestingly, I get a few visitors  this way – people who actually engage my posts via Likes, Reblogs and Comments. It is always heartwarming to interact with some of them and to connect in a richer and deeper way.

I think this is what “social” is all about.

I have decided that I won’t ever be going back to the Traffic Exchange. I don’t just need rooftop stats like views or visits. I want engagement. I prefer genuine contact. I long for discourse.

As we do our thing online, let’s remember that we are people and people are social beings that long to stay in touch with one another.

“And the LORD God said, it is not good that the man should be alone…” (Holy Bible: Genesis chapter 2, verse 18)

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